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narrative_character_generation_method

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narrative_character_generation_method [2013/01/17 09:58]
Mike Holmes created
narrative_character_generation_method [2019/12/26 15:00] (current)
mike_holmes
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 ====== Setting and Characters ====== ====== Setting and Characters ======
  
-The GM and player together decide on a typical starting place for adventures ​in the game world. The place should be somewhere the PCs would be known. We'll use the local tavern in a standard fantasy world for an example. ​ The decision of where the scene is set often says a little something about who the character will be. If it's a tavern, the character likely is somebody who would frequent a tavern. If the game has a "​[[Centralizing Concept]],"​ then the setting should make sense with that centralizing concept.  ​+The GM (or facilitator of the game or other willing player) ​and the player together decide on a typical starting place for action ​in the game world. The place should be somewhere the PCs would be known. We'll use the local tavern in a standard fantasy world for an example. ​ The decision of where the scene is set often says a little something about who the character will be. If it's a tavern, the character likely is somebody who would frequent a tavern. If the game has a "​[[Centralizing Concept]],"​ then the setting should make sense with that centralizing concept.  ​
  
 Next the GM invents a character who is in the know about the local population - this is called the "​Local"​ going forward. In our cliche example, a barkeep would be what you would probably expect for this. The player will play this character that the GM creates. ​ Next the GM invents a character who is in the know about the local population - this is called the "​Local"​ going forward. In our cliche example, a barkeep would be what you would probably expect for this. The player will play this character that the GM creates. ​
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 ===== Vetting ===== ===== Vetting =====
  
-When the character is fleshed out enough the GM and player ​agree that the scene comes to an end, and narrate the end of the conversation. The player then gets to decide if they want to play the character they'​ve just created through play. If so, then this phase is complete. If they decide they do not want to play the character created, the Nosy begins again with another question about another potential PC in the setting. ​+When the character is fleshed out enough the players involved ​agree that the scene comes to an end, and narrate the end of the conversation. The player ​seeking a character ​then gets to decide if they want to play the character they'​ve just created through play. If so, then this phase is complete. If they decide they do not want to play the character created, the Nosy begins again with another question about another potential PC in the setting. ​
  
 If the PC is close, but not quite right, the player can accept the potential PC as their PC, and state that some of what the Local said about the PC was incorrect information (nobody is perfect), and come up with the actual facts about the PC. If the PC is close, but not quite right, the player can accept the potential PC as their PC, and state that some of what the Local said about the PC was incorrect information (nobody is perfect), and come up with the actual facts about the PC.
narrative_character_generation_method.1358445518.txt.gz ยท Last modified: 2013/01/17 09:58 by Mike Holmes